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Enzymes

Amylase is one of the primary starch-digesting enzymes secreted in the body. This enzyme is somewhat unusual in that it is produced not only by the pancreas but also in the mouth as a component of saliva. In the oral cavity, as food is chewed and mixes with saliva, amylase begins the enzymatic digestion of dietary starch and glycogen (carbohydrates) into smaller molecules and ultimately glucose and maltose. (more…)

Beans, greens (especially cruciferous vegetables like broccoli, cabbage, and cauliflower) and heavy carbohydrate-laden foods can cause gassiness and bloating. These foods have carbohydrates that are linked to proteins or fats (known as glycoproteins or glycolipids) which aren't effectively broken down in the gut; these poorly-digested particles then serve as a food source for intestinal bacteria. (more…)

Invertase is a carbohydrate-digesting enzyme that splits sucrose (common table sugar) into its component parts, glucose and fructose. It is generally derived from a beneficial strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and then purified to be used either by itself or as a part of a multi-enzyme formula. Combined with other carbohydrates, it enhances the overall digestion of starch, sugar and other carbohydrates. (more…)

Maltase is a carbohydrate-digesting enzyme that cleaves the bond linking the two parts of the maltose sugar molecule. Maltose is a naturally-occurring sugar that is produced as the body breaks down starches from long chains into shorter molecules using the amylase enzyme and also in germinating seeds as preparation for sprouting. It is also a by-product of heating sugar during various cooking processes, specifically during caramelization at higher temperatures in which the the sugar present in food turns brown. (more…)